Karmøygeddon

Metalmoments on Karmøygeddon:

About the place:

Karmøygeddon is a Norwegian festival as well as a society with the same name. The Karmøygeddon society hosts two festivals a year, Karmøygeddon (which is the one we visited and reviewed here) and Karmøygeddon Arctic; Karmøygeddon is held in the spring (19-21 April in 2012) whereas Karmøygeddon Arctic, the smaller of the two, is held in the late fall (15 October in 2011).

Karmøygeddon is located in the city of Haugesund, and is an indoors festival with two stages, Byscenen which is the main stage and Jimmy Legs which is the smaller stage; both stages are located in the same pub/concert venue in the city centre; this makes it very easy to access and it’s fast to get from nearby hotels to the venue (less than 5 minutes walking). The festival also hosts an afterparty floor with a metal DJ for those who feel like having a break from the shows, and also bars with outdoor service.
As the two stages are never open at the same time, Jimmy Legs serves as a pre-party of sorts, there is never any risk of concerts overlapping.

As Karmøygeddon is an indoors festival within a city, there is no camping ground and tenting possible, but there are several hotels and room-for-rent within different price ranges to choose from.
The town itself isn’t very big, but in the centre there is a nice shopping street that’s very lively and has a few events going on.
The landscape is also great, flying in you can see the fjords, there are lakes and the nature is everywhere.
So, if you feel like spending your mornings before the festival begins with something else than the city life, the Norwegian outback is just around the corner, with several hiking possibilities in beautiful surroundings. This means that if you can afford to stay a bit longer, you will be able to enjoy the nature and the town!
Just remember to pack good shoes...

About travelling:

Haugesund is a nice town on the west coast of Norway, located approximately at the same longitude as Oslo, and in an almost directly straight line south of Bergen.
The closest train station is Stavanger (90 km away) and from there you can go either by ferry or by bus. Both the ferries and the bus line go as far as Bergen and back.

Haugesund has an airport which you can either fly directly to with a few companies, or make a transfer in Oslo. There is of course an airport bus to town, and should it not match the flight timetable (which it doesn't always do), you can get a cab to/from the airport.

Roads are scarce, so it is probably a better choice relying on public transport than on driving yourself, even if this is of course also an option.

About prices:

It is no secret that Norway is an expensive country, so bear this in mind when calculating a festival budget. The ticket price per 2012 was 900 NOK (approx. 120€), and about the same for 2 nights at a nearby hotel.
Knowing this, the festival put some effort into making the stay as affordable as possible by having the beer prices at the venue unusually low compared to country standards – a pint of beer was 55 NOK (approx. 7€), which in comparison is less than twice the price in the supermarket.

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